How Can We Help?
Categories
Table of Contents
< All Topics
Print

Free Air Compressor SOP (Safe Operating Procedure)

Download our free Air Compressor SOP:

*For internal use only. Not for resale or redistribution. By downloading, you agree to our Free Resources Licensing Agreement.

Air Compressor SOP Example

Purpose of Document

Air compressor SOPs outline a safe operating procedure for air compressor use. The SOP can also be used as a training and induction document. The primary goal is to protect workers from injury or illness by outlining a safe system of work and providing adequate training and instruction. This form is broadly aligned with AS45001:2018.

How to Use

This Air Compressor SOP should be communicated to workers before they complete the task. A hard copy can also be displayed in the workplace or provided at the workface. You can also use this document during the induction or onboarding process. This document is a template only and should be customised for your business.

When to Use

Workers should read and agree to comply with the Air Compressor SOP prior to operation within your business. It can also be used for refresher training periodically.

Who Should Use

Air compressor SOPs should be developed by a competent person. The SOP is then read and followed by the worker completing the task. New workers should also read and understand the SOPs during the induction or onboarding process.

Legal Considerations

There is no specific legal requirement to have a documented Safe Operating Procedure (SOP). However, it is best practice, as having SOPs can assist in meeting general legal duties, including:

  • s(19)(3)c WHS Act – Duty to Provide Safe Systems of Work
  • s(19)(3)d WHS Act – Duty to Ensure Safe Use of Plant
  • s(19)(3)f WHS Act – Duty to Provide Adequate Information, Training, Instruction and Supervision
  • s(39) WHS Regulations – Duty to Provide Adequate Information, Training, and Instruction
  • s(203) WHS Regulations – Management of Risks to Health and Safety (PCBUs with management or control of plant)

The Code of Practice “Managing risks of plant in the workplace” states that employers (PCBUs) must provide workers with information, training, and instruction as necessary to protect them from risks arising from the use of the plant.

FAQ

What is an Air Compressor?

An air compressor is a mechanical device that converts power from an electric motor, diesel engine, or gasoline engine into potential energy stored in pressurized air.

What is an Air Compressor used for?

An air compressor is used to power pneumatic tools and equipment such as impact wrenches, nail guns, and spray guns, as well as for inflating tires, powering HVAC systems, and operating pneumatic machinery in various industrial and commercial applications.

What hazards are involved in using an Air Compressor?

Some hazards that are involved in Air Compressor use include:

  • High-pressure air release
  • Noise exposure
  • Electrical hazards
  • Mechanical hazards (e.g., rotating parts)

What are some safety controls that can be utilised during Air Compressor use?

Some safety controls that can be utilised include:

  • Regular maintenance
  • Operator training
  • Wearing PPE
  • Ensuring proper ventilation

Did you know?

The air compressor, a ubiquitous device in countless industries, has a fascinating history spanning centuries. Its origins can be traced back to ancient civilizations, where humans utilized simple air compressors, such as bellows, to generate airflow for various tasks like smelting metals and stoking fires. However, it wasn’t until the 17th century that significant advancements occurred, with the invention of the first mechanical air compressor by German scientist Otto von Guericke. This device, known as the “Hemispheres Experiment,” demonstrated the power of air pressure. Throughout the Industrial Revolution, air compressors evolved rapidly, becoming essential in powering pneumatic machinery and tools. Today, air compressors come in various types and sizes, serving diverse purposes in industries ranging from manufacturing and construction to automotive and healthcare.

Article Sources and Further Reading

Contact Us